MAGAZINES SELECTED BY ZOË TAYLOR

By Zoë Taylor | Intro: Elia Maqueda. October 10, 2012

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From the hands of Zoë Taylor grow clear, dark and translucent women. Amongst the thousand curvilinear figures drawn by the artist, we find models, opera singers, virgins and poets, who always stare at us from inside the image as saying "What? Don't you think it's normal to find me here?"

The work of this London based illustrator has appeared in publications as important as
The Guardian or The Independent, and you can usually find her in the pages of AnOther Magazine. And since it’s all about magazines, she has prepared for us a selection of her favourite.



I love the magazine and zine formats and have many odd issues of things piled up at home so it was hard to make a selection. I tried to pick the ones that I buy regularly or would buy regularly if they were still around.

 

Destroy All Your Monsters

Destroy All Monsters

Destroy All Monsters is the zine of a Detroit band and collective of the same name that formed in 1973. They released six zines between 1976 and 1979, which are really hard to get hold of now so thank goodness a book has come out that reproduces them all in facsimile. I love them for their juxtapositions: horror, sci-fi, Antonin Artaud, psychedelia, fin de siècle prints, collages of old movie stills, comics and other elements of pop culture. They’re chaotic and darkly humorous and lead singer Niagara’s drawings are great.


 

Garageland

Garageland

Garageland is a unique arts and culture magazine published by artist Kathy Lomax’s gallery, Transition. Written and illustrated by artists, each issue addresses a theme: Baroque, Supernatural, Rock ‘n’ Roll, Fake, Film and Beauty are some that they’ve covered. The writing is thoughtful but also playful. I like the emphasis on film, kitsch, pop culture and works that evoke a kind of dreamy melancholy.


 

New Scientist

New Scientist

It’s great that this exists –a magazine that explains the latest scientific discoveries in an accessible way. It’s exciting to know about new findings in physics, neurology, genetics etc., as well as new technologies, because they change the way you think about the deep questions in life.


 

Wire

Wire

I don’t always love the writing but there must be a reason why I keep buying it. Its aim is to navigate music and sound works that are in the margins or don’t get so much exposure so it’s a great resource for discovering something new or expanding your ideas about audio things.


 

Acne Paper

Acne Paper

Acne Paper covers art and culture and there are also fashion shoots. Each issue is themed; the latest is on the body but it’s more about representations of the body. It looks good and I like it partly for its design. It’s a large-format publication, featuring great photographs and other images. It also selects good writers and interesting subjects.


 

Purple Journal

The Purple Journal

I like the idea behind The Purple Journal: musings by writers and photographers living in different parts of the world on some aspect of where they are living or some other observation. It’s eloquent, positive and gets you dreaming about geography.


 

Syntax Editions

Syntax Editions

Syntax Editions is the publishing project of the ever elusive and controversial CS Leigh. He has produced two magazines so far, The Annotated Spectacle and Too Much Night. Both are curious publications, juxtaposing art, fashion, film, politics and a kind of morbidity. Among the fashion shoots, artist interviews and film reviews, Too Much Night features several obituaries and the 50-page centre piece concerns a conspiracy theory about the death of JFK Jr. CS Leigh has said, “I think Too Much Night is about being fed up with all the bullshit and all the fake dazzle that is painted over everything in the culture industries nowadays.” These magazines are unusual, pretty lavish and feature no advertising whatsoever; instead they are punctuated by enigmatic, full-page quotes or cryptic “annotations”. They are designed to be elusive and curious and they do that well. They are self-conscious but not entirely cynical. I keep returning to them.

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