'I was a ‘darks’ and I am a ‘darks’...', by Borja Prieto (Part II)

By Borja Prieto. January 11, 2013

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After Borja Prieto's first part of goth hits, we bet you want more. His playlist could be endless but we have asked him to choose the last nine songs to close this 'dark' start to the year. So, get dressed like Robert Smith, close your eyes and imagine that you are the starring in the 'Lullaby'  music video like if this was 1989.

 

'El signo de la cruz' - Décima Víctima

There was a time not very long ago when finding recordings by Décima Víctima was practically impossible in Spain. In the 90s, my dark period, I bought their first album, a single and a recorded tape of their second album we even used to buy recorded tapes then. My life changed and that was when my obsession with dark Spanish groups began so I'm very grateful to them. This is one of the ten best Spanish songs of all time.
 




'El vinilo' - Betty Troupe


For me, the temple is the best part of belonging to a music ghetto: the bars and clubs where you can find others of your species, where your music is played, where you can flirt with your own kind. Those were the days! At one stage I lived for Toque BCN, a club where they played dark music on calle Aragón in Barcelona. I remember waiting all week for SATURDAY to come around. I remember staying at María de la Fuente's house with Didac Aparicio, Ferrán Teres, Fra and all the other onions layered up in all our finery, putting make-up on and drinking. I remember going there by bus and the looks we got from passers-by when they saw 15 year-old idiots dressed like Robert Smith. It was a look somewhere between fear, amusement and pity. I remember arriving at the temple, my home. For me, the highlight of the night was always when they played El vinilo, by Betty Troupe. It's difficult to describe how I still feel when I listen to this amazing song. It's happiness and, in some way, it's my secret to eternal youth.




'The Devil´s Dancer' - Oppenheimer´s Analysis


This is another incomparable secret. England, 1984, originally released on tape and given back to the world thanks to the label Minimal Wave. There are no words.
 




'Voces en la jungla' - Los Monaguillosh

In the 90s we discovered new bands in a different way. Nowadays somebody tells you about a song and you search for it on Spotify. Back then somebody would tell you about a song and, at best, that person could pass it on to you on a tape, which in turn had been recorded from another tape. Of course, part of the song would be cut off and you could hear the radio presenter's voice introducing it. Those were other, more difficult, times. I discovered Los Monaguillosh in an issue of Rock Espezial from 1982 (the precursor to Rockdelux), which I bought from Papermusic and that also featured a list of dark Spanish bands. They made some fantastic lists. That same Christmas, I bought this single for 2,000 pesetas at Discos Bangladesh, when it was in the Rios Rosas area of Madrid. I still play it. They’re a mega-dark group from Madrid that someone should re-release.
 




'Love will tear us apart' -
Swans (Joy Division)

All the hipsters love Swans now but in the 90s they were a dark group, their records were cheap as chips at calle Tallers and all us darks loved them, Jarboe when she went solo, Skin and all the groups similar to them. All those records, which are collector's items now, are still great. I remember we went to Discos Jesús once (the most legendary of shops) and found ten copies of a maxi single with a white sleeve which was Swans’ version of a Joy Division classic. We each bought one. It's pretty hard to make a good version of a hit that should never be covered but Swans managed it.
 




'Just Because'
-
Martin Dupont  y '1500' - Those Attractive Magnets

It was thanks to the distributor Atmosfera Abrupta that I discovered this French genius and these American freaks. Let me highlight how important distributors are to music ghettos. When we were young, a distributor from Manresa called Músicas de Régimen became our private dark material dealer, a kind of Amazon or Insound offering a tailor-made service. David, that was the name of the guy who managed it, told you what he had received and you could either add it to or remove it from your order. His descriptions were always so precise, so riddled with juicy and unknown references that you were always tempted. I owe that man a lot despite all the dosh I gave him. Atmósfera Abrupta became my dealer three years ago. They gave me back that eagerness to continue compulsively buying coldwave and minimal wave records, which are nothing more than dark mutations. Listen to Martin Dupont and the LP by Those Attractive Magnets from the label Dark Entries. They're something else.
 







'Cantara' - Dead Can Dance


My parents never understood anything about my dark phase but they did respect me. The only thing that connected us then was Dead Can Dance which in time I have come to realise is really the kind of music parents listen to. Us darks bought everything by Dead Can Dance and although we weren't into the whole medieval thing at all, we felt like they were an interspatial channel to another age - a kind of black hole that took us to another century. I still love them today and I can see myself in a few years’ time with a grey beard, cigar in hand, heading to one of their shows at Palau de la Música in Barcelona with my children. It’s a group that appeals to all audiences.
 


 


'Windscreen'
- Martial Canterel

Proof that dark music is still alive and kicking. Martial Canterel is a Canadian from the environs of a label that recovers and updates the best sounds from the current dark orbit: Wierd Records. Everything they release is a complete must-have. Just under a year ago I was at Wierd Club, a superclub they put on in a club in an American city, and I realised two things. Firstly, I noticed how much I continue to like the dark hits and secondly that there are still loads of darks in the world and that they dress better than they used to. I know, I'll be dark forever and ever.
 




*Borja Prieto is the director and host of the radio music show Está pasando.

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